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Tips To Improve Job Satisfaction

Article from EHS today

 

http://www.ehstoday.com/safety-leadership/15-ways-boost-job-satisfaction-infographic

 

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Mindful Employers

Great article from flipboard of a Drexel University research review and suggestions.

https://flipboard.com/@flipboard/-a-new-study-shows-employers-need-to-be-/f-88ca92e8d4%2Finc.com

Link to the Drexel University page:

http://drexel.edu/now/archive/2017/November/Sitting-in-the-workplace-should-employers-be-held-accountable/

 

 

Employee Satisfaction and Market Value

There are a few studies out there looking at the trend in the market value of a company and comparing that information to the organizations stock performance. One common finding: Companies that are the best to work for have several employee -friendly policies and perks and are very profitable. This allows them to recruit and retain top employees to their organizations.

The following is a link to the Glassdoor study from 2015 on the subject.

https://glassdoor.app.box.com/s/49y1ulkftvbpsbqjgeo1zh3lvijbb9uo

Our data from the industrial based massage program shows employees 100% satisfied with the care they receive along with an increase in morale after addition of the program. Contact us to help increase your employee morale and reduce your liability of musculoskeletal disorders.

Using Total Worker Health® Concepts to Reduce the Health Risks from Sedentary Work

U.S. workplaces have become increasingly sedentary, with resulting negative health effects. Through its Total Worker Health® Program, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recommends an integrated approach to addressing sedentary work environments. An integrated approach is one that protects workers from work-related injury and illness and helps them advance their overall health and well-being, on and off the job. This document describes organizational practices that can reduce the risks associated with sedentary work.

Using Total Worker Health® Concepts to Reduce the Health Risks from Sedentary Work[PDF – 891 KB]

 

Overexertion: The Real Issue

If you hadn’t read this title and someone asked you, “What is the top cause of musculoskeletal injury in the workplace?” what would your reply be? Chances are you would have said repetitive motion injuries.

Overexertion injuries top the list of workplace related musculoskeletal disorders reported in 2016 in regards to the data from the 2013 U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. For comparison, in 1998 the Liberty Mutual Workplace Safety Index reported from the BLS overexertion injury cost approximately $9.8 billion dollars. For 2013 they reported an estimated cost of $15 billion dollars. Compared to the estimate for repetitive motion injuries costing approximately $1.8 billion dollars in 2013.

There are differences in the two terms and how injuries are classified and recorded. Repetitive motion injuries are just that, injuries caused by repeatedly performing a specific motion as a part of a task. The term doesn’t necessarily take in to account force applied to the motion, but it is thought that continuous use causes excessive strain on the tissues leading to swelling and ultimately pain or neurologic symptoms. Read more

High Prevalence of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome among Poultry Workers

Click the link to read an interesting NIOSH science blog post regarding carpal tunnel syndrome among poultry workers.

 

Criteria for a Recommended Standard: Occupational Exposure to Heat and Hot Environments

Occupational exposure to heat can result in injuries, disease, reduced productivity, and death. To address this hazard, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has evaluated the scientific data on heat stress and hot environments and has updated the Criteria for a Recommended Standard: Occupational Exposure to Hot Environments. Read more

OSHA First Aid List

CFR 29 Part 1904.7(b)(5)(iv)

Q: Does the professional status of the person providing the treatment have any effect on what is considered First Aid, or medical treatment?

A: No, OSHA considers the treatments to be First Aid regardless of the professional status of the person providing the treatment. Even when these treatments are provided by a physician, or other licensed health care professional they are considered First Aid for the purposes of CFR 29 Part 1904.

Table listing what is considered ‘first aid’ according to OSHA.

FirstAidList

Alternative Keyboards

To date, there is little information to assist people interested in purchasing alternative keyboards. While the scientific evidence about whether alternative keyboards prevent musculoskeletal disorders is inconclusive at this time, this document provides basic information about common alternative keyboard designs and their effects on work posture.

Alternative Keyboards[PDF – 471 KB]

 

Reducing Musculoskeletal Disorders among Airport Baggage Screeners and Handlers

Baggage screeners and handlers at airports are exposed to manual baggage lifting and handling that are associated with work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs). The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) evaluated two mechanical lift aids to determine if they could reduce the risk of WMSDs. The two mechanical lift aids reduced some physical WMSD risk factors such as hand loading and spinal compression force.