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Great article from flipboard of a Drexel University research review and suggestions.

https://flipboard.com/@flipboard/-a-new-study-shows-employers-need-to-be-/f-88ca92e8d4%2Finc.com

Link to the Drexel University page:

http://drexel.edu/now/archive/2017/November/Sitting-in-the-workplace-should-employers-be-held-accountable/

 

 

If you hadn’t read this title and someone asked you, “What is the top cause of musculoskeletal injury in the workplace?” what would your reply be? Chances are you would have said repetitive motion injuries.

Overexertion injuries top the list of workplace related musculoskeletal disorders reported in 2016 in regards to the data from the 2013 U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. For comparison, in 1998 the Liberty Mutual Workplace Safety Index reported from the BLS overexertion injury cost approximately $9.8 billion dollars. For 2013 they reported an estimated cost of $15 billion dollars. Compared to the estimate for repetitive motion injuries costing approximately $1.8 billion dollars in 2013.

There are differences in the two terms and how injuries are classified and recorded. Repetitive motion injuries are just that, injuries caused by repeatedly performing a specific motion as a part of a task. The term doesn’t necessarily take in to account force applied to the motion, but it is thought that continuous use causes excessive strain on the tissues leading to swelling and ultimately pain or neurologic symptoms. Read more

CFR 29 Part 1904.7(b)(5)(iv)

Q: Does the professional status of the person providing the treatment have any effect on what is considered First Aid, or medical treatment?

A: No, OSHA considers the treatments to be First Aid regardless of the professional status of the person providing the treatment. Even when these treatments are provided by a physician, or other licensed health care professional they are considered First Aid for the purposes of CFR 29 Part 1904.

Table listing what is considered ‘first aid’ according to OSHA.

FirstAidList

European researchers studied the effects of environmental and psychosocial factors and their relationship with musculoskeletal disorders (MSD). The survey was conducted among hospital workers in the UK and they looked at responses relating MSDs to temperature, anxiety, depression, light and noise, and job demand. The most interesting finding from the study was that MSDs of the upper extremity were strongly related to job strain and temperature.

Read more