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In February of 2017 the American College of Physicians issued guidelines for the treatment of acute and sub-acute low back pain. They recommend trying non-drug related therapies first. The list includes massage, heat, acupuncture and spinal manipulation and mindful meditation.

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The most recent Cochrane review of randomized control trials (RCT) involving relief of low back pain using massage was published in 2015. The review examined 25 RCT and found that massage was better than inactivity in the short term for pain relief. They also found that massage was better than active controls in the short and long term for pain relief. Read the full review at the link below.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD001929.pub3/epdf
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If you hadn’t read this title and someone asked you, “What is the top cause of musculoskeletal injury in the workplace?” what would your reply be? Chances are you would have said repetitive motion injuries.

Overexertion injuries top the list of workplace related musculoskeletal disorders reported in 2016 in regards to the data from the 2013 U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. For comparison, in 1998 the Liberty Mutual Workplace Safety Index reported from the BLS overexertion injury cost approximately $9.8 billion dollars. For 2013 they reported an estimated cost of $15 billion dollars. Compared to the estimate for repetitive motion injuries costing approximately $1.8 billion dollars in 2013.

There are differences in the two terms and how injuries are classified and recorded. Repetitive motion injuries are just that, injuries caused by repeatedly performing a specific motion as a part of a task. The term doesn’t necessarily take in to account force applied to the motion, but it is thought that continuous use causes excessive strain on the tissues leading to swelling and ultimately pain or neurologic symptoms. Read more

The practice of yoga is said to connect the participants’ body, mind and breath to create awareness, calmness and improved overall well-being. Previous studies have also found yoga to be beneficial for increasing strength, flexibility and decreasing stress, anxiety and pain related to musculoskeletal disorders. The 2016 Yoga In America Study conducted by the Yoga Journal (www.yogajournal.com/yogainamericastudy) claims 36 million people report doing yoga in the US with women making up approximately 72% of practitioners.

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The Impact of Massage Therapy on Function in Pain Populations—A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials: Part I, Patients Experiencing Pain in the General Population

This review of literature regarding the effectiveness of massage therapy for treating pain was overall positive. They found that outcome for pain management using massage was better than sham, no treatment or active treatment. They also found that massage was beneficial for the treatment of anxiety. The authors conclusions based on the evidence in the studies reviewed suggest that massage therapy should be strongly recommended as a pain management option.

Follow the link to read the study.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4925170/

 

Raquel Baldelomar, Contributer, Forbes, April 1, 2016

Most people still view massages as a luxury item. They feel like they are spoiling themselves by booking a massage whether it’s a 30-minute massage, one-hour massage or a four-hour spa day. But some business leaders are starting to look at massage more as a necessity just like working out and eating healthy. Study after study keeps touting the benefits of massage. As a result, many executives are changing their mindset from thinking of massage as a nice treat to thinking of massage as an essential item in their routine that helps them perform at the top of their game. Here are five reasons why you should stop making excuses and book that massage today.

CFR 29 Part 1904.7(b)(5)(iv)

Q: Does the professional status of the person providing the treatment have any effect on what is considered First Aid, or medical treatment?

A: No, OSHA considers the treatments to be First Aid regardless of the professional status of the person providing the treatment. Even when these treatments are provided by a physician, or other licensed health care professional they are considered First Aid for the purposes of CFR 29 Part 1904.

Table listing what is considered ‘first aid’ according to OSHA.

FirstAidList