Posts

The most recent Cochrane review of randomized control trials (RCT) involving relief of low back pain using massage was published in 2015. The review examined 25 RCT and found that massage was better than inactivity in the short term for pain relief. They also found that massage was better than active controls in the short and long term for pain relief. Read the full review at the link below.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD001929.pub3/epdf
Read more

If you hadn’t read this title and someone asked you, “What is the top cause of musculoskeletal injury in the workplace?” what would your reply be? Chances are you would have said repetitive motion injuries.

Overexertion injuries top the list of workplace related musculoskeletal disorders reported in 2016 in regards to the data from the 2013 U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. For comparison, in 1998 the Liberty Mutual Workplace Safety Index reported from the BLS overexertion injury cost approximately $9.8 billion dollars. For 2013 they reported an estimated cost of $15 billion dollars. Compared to the estimate for repetitive motion injuries costing approximately $1.8 billion dollars in 2013.

There are differences in the two terms and how injuries are classified and recorded. Repetitive motion injuries are just that, injuries caused by repeatedly performing a specific motion as a part of a task. The term doesn’t necessarily take in to account force applied to the motion, but it is thought that continuous use causes excessive strain on the tissues leading to swelling and ultimately pain or neurologic symptoms. Read more

The practice of yoga is said to connect the participants’ body, mind and breath to create awareness, calmness and improved overall well-being. Previous studies have also found yoga to be beneficial for increasing strength, flexibility and decreasing stress, anxiety and pain related to musculoskeletal disorders. The 2016 Yoga In America Study conducted by the Yoga Journal (www.yogajournal.com/yogainamericastudy) claims 36 million people report doing yoga in the US with women making up approximately 72% of practitioners.

Read more

Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) in the form of overexertion sprains and strains and repetitive trauma disorders continue to claim two of the top ten most common workplace injuries. It has become a huge cost to employers as the 2013 estimates for these conditions combined exceed $16 billion dollars. Employers are addressing these conditions by looking at ways to prevent the issue from happening, detect the issue early, and utilize an effective solution to manage the conditions.

Prevention is key and begins with an analysis of the workers environment. Typically this is referred to an ergonomist. These professionals analyze the workers environment to increase efficiency and decrease disorders arising from any undue stressors. Simply put, ergonomics fits the job to the person.

Educating employees on early detection of MSD is necessary to minimize impact on productivity and to increase the likelihood of quick resolution of the condition. When the symptoms of MSD are minimal and in the early stages conservative, first aid care can help speed the recovery process without the need for more costly interventions and can minimize productivity loss.

Read more

CFR 29 Part 1904.7(b)(5)(iv)

Q: Does the professional status of the person providing the treatment have any effect on what is considered First Aid, or medical treatment?

A: No, OSHA considers the treatments to be First Aid regardless of the professional status of the person providing the treatment. Even when these treatments are provided by a physician, or other licensed health care professional they are considered First Aid for the purposes of CFR 29 Part 1904.

Table listing what is considered ‘first aid’ according to OSHA.

FirstAidList

European researchers studied the effects of environmental and psychosocial factors and their relationship with musculoskeletal disorders (MSD). The survey was conducted among hospital workers in the UK and they looked at responses relating MSDs to temperature, anxiety, depression, light and noise, and job demand. The most interesting finding from the study was that MSDs of the upper extremity were strongly related to job strain and temperature.

Read more